How our speech differs from written English

One of the many uses of oral history is to help us study the way we use spoken language, and how this can differ from written English. Transcribing interviews to a written form is an important part of the process Read More …

Hearing the voice of a relative for the first time…

Have you ever thought of using oral history recordings in your family or local history research? Recording your own interviews with relatives is a valuable addition to your research.  However, previously recorded interviews can also provide family and local history Read More …

Oral history of the Great Depression part 2

My previous post introduced the Unemployment Relief Scheme settlement in Meadows that was established during the Great Depression.  Oral history interviewees talked about what it was like to live there in cottages that had been described as ‘roomy tin bungalows’ Read More …

Oral history of the Great Depression

One of the most valuable aspects of oral history is being able to ask someone exactly what it was like to experience a certain event or era.  I was fortunate to record interviews with two people who had grown up Read More …

Oral history at Oodnadatta Museum

Oral history is a wonderful way of bringing life to museum displays – making the history more accessible and meaningful. Oodnadatta is a small town in South Australia, 1 034 km north of Adelaide.  It has a fascinating history that Read More …